Handling @percolate's data in New York City
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Bitcoin Trading Platform Vaurum Raises $4m in Seed Funding

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California-based Vaurum, a company that offers financial institutions a way to trade and store bitcoins, has raised $4m in venture capital.

The investment is described as a seed round and comes from a group of investors that includes VC firm Battery Ventures, Tim Draper and former AOL CEO Steve Case.

Avish Bhama, Vaurum CEO, said in a prepared statement:

Continue reading at CoinDesk

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Git Commit

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Merge branch 'asdfasjkfdlas/alkdjf' into sdkjfls-final
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10 public comments
brico
3890 days ago
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Yup. Thank goodness for rebase -i
Brooklyn, NY
AlK
3890 days ago
reply
Sad but true :D
Paris
SkullyFM
3520 days ago
so true
AlK
3520 days ago
hey
analogue
3891 days ago
reply
How git commits are getting worse and worse
New York, USA
economyaki
3891 days ago
reply
http://www.commitlogsfromlastnight.com/
the collective wisdom of git is truly staggering.
nyc
javyer
3891 days ago
reply
git commit -m "fix"
git commit -m "fix/2"
git commit -m "fix/3"
Buenos Aires, Argentina
MourningDragon
3891 days ago
reply
looks familiar...
yashimii
3891 days ago
ich schmeiss mich weg
joshwa
3891 days ago
reply
does that graph look upside-down to anyone else?
El Cerrito
Ludwig
3891 days ago
He appears to be using a GUI tool rather than "git log --graph"… but there should be a sort triangle on the Date header.
tsuckow
3891 days ago
gitk is the other way. Wouldn't surprise me if some windows/mac client was oriented this way.
joshwa
3891 days ago
gitx on mac's default sort is also newest-first...
Gnoupi
3891 days ago
Or simply it makes more sense to read it this way, from a comic strip. The effect would be lost also if the "qsdflmkqsjdfm" rows were coming first.
saucistophe
3891 days ago
Randall has strong views on vertical text disposition: http://xkcd.com/781/
DuskStar
3891 days ago
reply
This reminds me of what my git history looks like after a Hackathon... Only with less profanity.
Ann Arbor MI
trparky
3891 days ago
reply
Alt Text... "Merge branch 'asdfasjkfdlas/alkdjf' into sdkjfls-final"
ghling
3889 days ago
did you need to type that by yourself?

The NewsBlur iPhone and iPad app meets iOS 7

6 Comments and 8 Shares

Apple’s latest operating system for iOS is a departure from their old aesthetic. So I’ve decided to give the NewsBlur iOS app a slightly new look. But even more than how the app looks is how the app works. Tons of new features made it into this mega-release.

  • Entire interfacer has been redesigned for iOS 7.
  • Gestures galore: mark stories as read/unread, save stories, mark feeds as read, train feeds.
  • Long press a feed or folder to choose a mark as read date: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days. Works offline, too!
  • Long press a story title to send it to a third-party read later service.
  • New view layout for iPad: move story titles to the bottom in portrait.
  • Significantly improved scrolling speeds on the feed list and story list.
  • You can now unread stories that were read while offline.
  • Faster marking of folders as read.
  • Fixed numerous bugs related to reading stories while offline.

The iPad app also has a new view for extra-wide reading while in portrait orientation.

I hope you enjoy this latest update. And stay tuned for the next update coming soon which will include even more iOS 7 features: Dynamic Text Size and Background Updates. The NewsBlur iOS app is and will always be free.

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sjk
3920 days ago
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Looking forward to similar improvements to the Android tablet version.
Florida
Ferdinand
3921 days ago
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Why does it seem the number 2 mobile platform gets the most love?
webreaper
3920 days ago
Maybe because with GrazeRSS, Android already has the best offline Newsblur client? ;-)
WebWrangler
3920 days ago
Just because more people use android doesn't mean more NewsBlur customers use android.
peelman
3920 days ago
Why is it whenever an android user opens his or her mouth I see the comic book guy from The Simpsons...
roskosmos
3921 days ago
reply
Best gets better
csharptest
3920 days ago
Unless you are still using iOS 6, then it nags you to upgrade every time you fetch stories. Just don't bother clicking 'Upgrade' because the new app requires iOS 7.
samuel
3920 days ago
It shouldn't ask you to update if you're on iOS 6.
csharptest
3919 days ago
@sam, agreed it "shouldn't", but yet it continues without a care for my thoughts on what it should or should not do.
analogue
3921 days ago
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Offline improvements are always good to take !
New York, USA
maise
3921 days ago
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Gestures will be really nice.
Jersey City

Upping unread stories to 30 days for premium accounts

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While I love shipping new features and fixing bugs, the single largest user request was neither a feature nor a bug. NewsBlur allows for two weeks of unread stories. Once a story is more than 14 days old, it would no longer show up as unread. The justification for this was simple: you have a week to read a story, and have a second week as a grace period.

But after scaling out to tens of thousands of users, a new pattern emerged. Some users would go on vacation for two weeks at a time and then want to catch up on everything they missed. Some users only check RSS once a month. Some users just want to leave lightly updated feeds alone until they have free time to read them, and that can take a few weeks to get to.

Starting today, all premium users are automatically upgraded to 30 days of unread stories. Free standard users will remain at 14 days. I wish I could have offered the full 30 days to everybody, but after testing that out, my server and performance graphs all made a very scary movement up.

With the new 30 day unread interval in place, NewsBlur has a great track record in listening to user feedback and working out a solution, however large the task may be.

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9 public comments
jbloom
3961 days ago
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For me 30 days is more than ideal. If it is over 30 days, I rarely go back and read it.
Columbus, Ohio
romkyns
3957 days ago
Only news stories get dated after 30 days. Feature length articles by great writers are still relevant a few years later; really no idea why people throw them away like this.
jbloom
3956 days ago
You make a very valid point.
rgsunico
3962 days ago
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This is awesome!
Prowsej
3961 days ago
This is nice!
pawnstorm
3962 days ago
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Thanks! This fits with how I use RSS much better.
Olympia, WA
seer
3962 days ago
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Thank you for this. I was the case that was on vacation for two weeks :-) After return I've noticed that every day I have something like 1000 unread blogposts. Now I understand why :-)
copyninja
3962 days ago
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Thanks!
India
analogue
3962 days ago
reply
Oh, I never knew this, I thought it was keeping them forever. I'll be more careful in the future to not miss anything !
New York, USA
maxkostow
3962 days ago
The stories are still there, just marked as read. I've found it to be both blessing and curse.
c_dave
3962 days ago
Well the latest 200 are there are anyway.
BLueSS
3962 days ago
reply
Awesome! Great reason for users to upgrade to paid accounts.
rtreborb
3962 days ago
reply
Thanks for the work, Samuel!
San Antonio, TX
glenn
3962 days ago
reply
Yay! Thanks Samuel!
Waterloo, Canada
redheadedfemme
3962 days ago
Thanks for all you do for us. I'm very happy with NewsBlur.
christophersw
3962 days ago
Ditto.
JonKnight
3962 days ago
excellent

Google Alerts Brings Back Support for Feeds

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Two months ago, when Google Reader disappeared, Google Alerts dropped support for feeds. Now feeds are back and they look just like before. Feeds continue to include references to Google Reader.



"As you can see, you have the option within 'deliver to' to deliver the alert to a feed. After you click 'create alert', you will be taken to the manage Google Alerts page where you will find the RSS URL you can copy and paste into your preferred RSS reader," informs Search Engine Land. (Feeds actually use Atom, not RSS.)

It's not clear why this feature was removed, but I wouldn't mind to see Google Reader back online. Quietly brilliant.
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bogorad
3965 days ago
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Hooray!
Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
samuel
3967 days ago
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Having just fixed issues with thousands of Google News feeds this morning, let's see how long this lasts.
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Urluba
3967 days ago
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#RSS back from the dead
Near Paris
analogue
3967 days ago
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What's up with Google, really...
New York, USA
angelchrys
3968 days ago
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Hooray!
Overland Park, KS

Amazon RDS Scales Up - Provision 3 TB and 30,000 IOPS Per DB Instance

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The Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) handles all of the messy low-level aspects of setting up, managing, and scaling MySQL, Oracle Database, and SQL Server databases. You can simply create an RDS DB instance with the desired processing power and storage space and RDS will take care of the rest.

The RDS Provisioned IOPS feature (see my recent blog post for more information) gives you the power to specify the desired number of I/O operations per second when you create each DB instance.  This allows you to set up instances with the desired level of performance while keeping your costs as low as possible.

Today we are introducing three new features to make Amazon RDS even more powerful and more scalable:

  1. Up to 3 TB of storage and 30,000 Provisioned IOPS.
  2. Conversion from Standard Storage to Provisioned IOPS storage.
  3. Independent scaling of IOPS and storage.

Let's take an in-depth look at each of these new features.

Up to 3 TB of Storage and 30,000 Provisioned IOPS
We are tripling the amount of storage that you can provision for each DB instance, and we're also tripling the number of IOPS for good measure.

You can now create DB instances (MySQL or Oracle) with up to 3 TB of storage (the previous limit was 1 TB) and 30,000 IOPS (previously, 10,000). SQL Server DB Instances can be created with up to 1TB of storage and 10,000 IOPS.

For a workload with 50% reads and 50% writes running on an m2.4xlarge instance, you can realize up to 25,000 IOPS for Oracle and 12,500 IOPS for MySQL. However, by provisioning up to 30,000 IOPS, you may be able to achieve lower latency and higher throughput. Your actual realized IOPS may vary from what you have provisioned based on your database workload, instance type, and choice of database engine. Refer to the Factors That Affect Realized IOPS section of the Amazon RDS User Guide to learn more.

Obviously, you can work with larger datasets, and you can read and write the data faster than before. You might want to start thinking about scaling PIOPS up and down over time in response to seasonal variations in load. You could also use a CloudWatch alarm to make sure that you are the first to know

You can modify the storage of existing instances that are running MySQL or Oracle Database. When you do this you can grow storage by 10% or more, and you can raise and lower PIOPS in units of 1,000. There will be a performance impact while the scaling process is underway.

Conversion from Standard Storage to Provisioned IOPS Storage
You can convert DB instances with Standard Storage to Provisioned IOPS in order to gain the benefits of fast and predictable performance. You can do this from the AWS Management Console, the command line, or through the RDS APIs. Simply Modify the instance and specify the desired number of PIOPS.

There will be a brief impact on availability when the modification process starts. If you are running a Multi-AZ deployment of RDS, the availability impact will be limited to the amount of time needed for the failover to complete (typically three minutes). The conversion may take several hours to complete and there may be a moderate performance degradation during this time.

Note: This feature is applicable to DB instances running MySQL or Oracle Database.

Independent Scaling of IOPS and Storage
You can now scale Provisioned IOPS and storage independently. In general, you will want to have between 3.0 and 10.0 IOPS per GB of storage. You can modify the ratio over time as your needs change.

Again, this feature is applicable to DB instances running MySQL or Oracle Database.

Available Now
All three of these features are available now, and they are available in every AWS Region where Provisioned IOPS are supported (all Regions except AWS GovCloud (US)).

You can use these features in conjunction with RDS Multi-AZ deployments and RDS Read Replicas.

-- Jeff;

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analogue
4148 days ago
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You can now store up to 3TB on a AWS RDS MySQL instance
New York, USA